Posts Tagged ‘Information Collection’

2 Evernote Future Plans Revealed

2009-06-17

More than ever, I wish I owned the iPhone; not the iTouch.

Before diving into the future of Evernote, make sure you know today’s news, by either looking at this announcement, or watching this video:

Evernote is one of those killer apps out there. I won’t spell its main features here. You should know them already. But let’s remember a few things.

Evernote runs on:

  • Your PC (under either Apple’s or Microsoft’s charm)
  • Your Mobile phone
  • Your iPod Touch
  • Your Browser

Evernote syncs your notes perfectly between each one of these platforms. And it’s very good at letting you organize your notes the way(s) you want.

I have only scratched the surface, and yet, Evernote is already besting out a lot of those cool Information Collection applications out there, including OneNote, EagleFiler, Together, Yojimbo, et al.

As if all that Evernote already does wasn’t enough, let me now share with you two secret, future features of Evernote, which are being planned by the company:

  1. Evernote will let web page clips keep their whole visual identity. Everything – layout, fonts, colors, images – will look exactly the same as it looked in your browser when you clipped it. The guys behind Evernote recognize how important this is to us – they’ve already shown us their commitment to keeping a hi-fi visual identity. It’s great to see they’re continuing in this line.
  2. Evernote will let you keep more metadata about your notes. You’re already able to tag your notes. You’ll be able to write notes about some part of another note; so one note could contain many notes about it. And all of these metanotes will be non-destructive. At last, you’ll be able to use a yellow pen to highlight key points in text, for future quick reference, and improved, preferred search results.

There’s many web products out there that have tried the annotation gig. If there’s one product that can at last solve it, it’s Evernote. That said, in this social era, I need to mention they also plan, of course, to put as much social sauce on these features as needed for us to thrive sharing our notes. I’m really glad about their plans.

When these features will start showing up, I will at last be able to stop using delicious/diigo/etc. – Evernote will be much better at keeping my bookmarks, with their visual identity, their full text, and my annotations. In fact, Evernote will kind of become my personal documents’ replicated file system. I will use it every day, and will rely on it for so many things in my life that I will be glad to pay them a subscription. And you will, too.

Oh, one more thing. These news might also come out as news to Evernote, the corporation. I don’t know if they knew they were planning these features; all I know is that if they didn’t yet, they now do.

Update: Phil Libin, Evernote’s CEO, twitted me: “Your Evernote secrets are surprisingly accurate. No promises on dates, though. Try shift-clicking on the Safari clipper.”

A Wagn in the Cloud

2009-06-11

wagn-logoI’m always on the lookout for a better wiki platform.

Wikis have already had a huge impact, from pet projects to enterprise solutions to Wikipedia, the popular free online encyclopedia.

Wagn could open up even bigger ideas about what online communities can do.

“Wagn is one of the freshest contributions to wiki since I coined the term.”
– Ward Cunningham, who invented wikis 15 years ago.

Wagn’s lead developer, Lewis Hoffman, explains Wagn this way:

“Like Wikipedia, all wikis give you the power to create web pages without speaking HTML. Wagn adds the power to create structure without speaking database, and it increasingly lets you create functionality without speaking programming code.”

The trick is in the cards. Wagn helps you organize all your information into “cards” that can be linked, nested, and formatted to create new structures. “Kind of like online legos,” says Hoffman. A given web page might contain dozens of cards organized into a set structure.

“Wikipedia has loads of community norms and policies, and their pages often have some structure, too. Look at the sidebar of the Wikipedia page for, say, “Wyoming,” and you’ll see structured information common to all the states: a flag, a seal, some nicknames… But the difference is that all of this information has been organized by hand. Someone had to go and manually insert that structure by adding special code to every single state page. So maintaining the pattern can take hours and hours of cut and paste. That strategy might work for Wikipedia, with its millions of contributors, but most wikis have more like five or ten editors who would appreciate a little more power.”
Ethan McCutchen, Wagn co-creator.

On the intention behind the concept of cards, we can read somewhere else:

So we started with smaller units than web pages, and we decided to call them “cards.”

We’re all familiar with lots of kinds of cards: playing cards, postcards, business cards, library cards…  They’re all different sizes and hold different amounts of information, everything from a picture to a filing record to a complete story.  The same goes for cards on Wagn.

As we started organizing cards of information about companies and products, we quickly saw patterns emerging.  We wanted company cards, for example, to include logo cards, address cards, etc.  This has been one of the driving ideas behind Wagn: cards including other cards in patterned ways.

One innovation of Wagn that’s worth mentioning is what they call Plus cards:

Also known as connections or connection cards, plus cards are one of the core innovations of Wagn.

The basic idea is that any two cards can be plussed together to create a third.  So for example, I might have a card about Dell Computers called “Dell” and another about labor issues called “labor”.  If I connect these two cards together I get a third called “Dell+labor”.  I can then enter into that card anything about the intersection of Dell and labor – Dell’s labor record in general, specific events, direct feedback, etc. Any time you see a + in the name of a card, you know you’re dealing with a plus card.

And something else is worth mentioning too: Form cards.

Wagn lets you create forms (called “cards”), and to apply a form to many cards, so that when you have a set of cards that are about the same kind of thing, you can be sure they will all contain the same information, in the same layout.

An example of a form card is that which every user gets when he signs up on the service: his User card. Each user’s card is made up of the user’s image, the user’s story, the user’s wiki, and finally, the user’s tags. You’ll see some of these in the screenshot below. Also note my highlights, were I have tried the Plus card feature, and the Inclusions feature:

wagn-daniel-jomphe

wagn-daniel-jomphe-edit

Note that my screenshots don’t show the whole layout of each page. There’s also comment boxes there and the whole site navigation cards.

Through the time I tested it, Wagn 1.0.0 worked well but showed many signs of immaturity: visual inconsistencies that needed me to refresh my web page to correct them (javascript issues), and a layout glitch when I tried the titled view style (which was otherwise very nice).

Wagn is available as a paid hosting plan, or as a free, GPL-licensed open source Ruby code project.

Were I to choose a wiki solution today, Wagn would be high in my list. That said, I believe the future Google Wave solution might eventually be used to kill quite a few wiki solutions out there. Meanwhile, here’s what the project leaders have to say about Wagn’s future:

Oh, it’s far from done — we’ve got literally hundreds of design ideas in our tracking system (which we built using Wagn).

Hat tip to Wagn 1.0+Press Release, The Story Behind Wagn 1.0, and the Documentation for most of the prose.

The #1 Best Place to Read

2008-08-31

It’s hard to cover the Web Information Collection news as good as CloudNotes does.  Be sure to check this blog out!  I just skimmed it and subscribed.  It’s already, in two months, something like 15 out of its 33 posts that I shared in Google Reader; that’s a very good signal-to-noise ratio.

In Rebate: Together

2008-06-12

I just wanted to let you know that for the next 9 or 10 days, you can buy Together for ~31$ instead of 40$.  That’s a nice rebate of about 25%, coming to you due to the Give Good Food to your Mac promotion.  You’ll find Together under the European Edition section/tab.

Together and Evernote: Updates Reviewed

2008-05-14

First, let’s get Evernote‘s business out now: I have updated my recent review to reflect its new beta 1.1 version.

Now, let’s take a look at TogetherIf you remember my comparative review of web information collection applications, you know I liked a lot Together.  Now that it’s been significantly upgraded in its new incarnation stamped Version 2.1, let’s see how our landscape of options evolved in the context of the comparative review.

  • Overall, with a global average score of 2.8, Together is more than ever a solid competitor to all the other 8 applications I’ve tested. Prior to its version 2.1, it only scored 2.4.  On many aspects, Together is now much more usable and mature. (more…)

Evernote for Mac Reviewed (beta version)

2008-03-22

evernote.png

Update (2008-05): The beta version was updated to 1.1, bringing support for PDF documents and some other minor goodies.  I’ve updated this post accordingly.  It also reflects the updated scores of Together 2.1.

In March, I was able to snag myself a TechCrunch invitation to try the upcoming Mac version of Evernote.  When I first discovered it in 2004 (for Windows), I soon became an advocate of Evernote for its organizational capabilities.  Evernote wasn’t perfect, but it was already a leader in the market and since then, it’s kept progressing at a steady pace.  Now that it’s starting to breathe on OS X, it’s time for a new testing round.

Today, I took a few hours to run Evernote against my web information collection test benchmark.  I’m now ready to share with you how Evernote, in its actual pre-release form, competes with the pack.

As this is pre-release software, please understand that Evernote will probably fare even better than now when it’ll reach Release Day.  Until then, here’s what I found. (more…)

EagleFiler 1.3 Reviewed

2008-03-14

Update (2008-05): Together and Evernote have been overhauled.  I’ve updated this post accordingly.

Reading this new version’s change list, which includes some great new features, I thought it’d be interesting to update my recent comparative review to see how EagleFiler now fares with its competitors.  But I’m not going to update the comparative review now, so I decided to simply post the score-changing differences here, along with their impact on EagleFiler’s evaluation.

  • EagleFiler’s global score for Collection brings it to become the second greatest of all the apps I’ve tested, for collection purposes (behind Evernote’s 65).  From 50, it raised to 62:
    • It’s now possible to import a selection of a web page as a web archive!  (You need to use Safari, or probably any other webkit-based browser.)  Until now, only Together supported this functionality.  This brings the score for Collection – Support from 26 to 29.
    • The addition of the optional window dialog to file what you collect (tags, comment, etc.) ups the score for Collection – Interaction from 18 to 24 and brings the score for Collection – Consistency from 6 to 9.
  • Various small improvements to EagleFiler’s tagging support bring its Organization – Tags integration score from 9 to 10, and its global Organization score from 30 to 31.

These changes bring EagleFiler’s global score from 124 to 138, with an average of 2.1 that now becomes 2.4.  That’s quite an improvement!

Now, there’s two more things I’d like to mention:

(more…)

8 Web Information Collectors Reviewed

2008-01-31

Update 3 (2008-05): I reviewed Evernote’s and Together’s recent updates.  While reading this post with its slightly outdated results chart, remember to use the one that’s besides this paragraph to get the updated results.

Update 2 (2008-03): Evernote is the new wolf that’s coming in the pack, and it already redefines most of what’s best.  Read this review to know how.

Update 1 (2008-03): EagleFiler’s new version 1.3 makes it fare much better.  Read this review to know what changes regarding the following comparative review, as I haven’t updated this post in any other way than this mention.

Although computers are great to work with information, in the last 10 years using a Windows PC, I never found any software solution that would work well for my information collecting and management needs, although OneNote and EverNote came close to it.  But now that I use a Mac, I wanted to see if I’d be able to find something really great.

Our Problem

I believe what makes it hard to find the good application for our needs is that we all have our own very personal ways of dealing with the information that comes before our eyes every day; but most importantly, I believe we still haven’t seen our software in general become mature. Software still behaves like a baby who won’t share his toys. Software will grow someday, but Software just isn’t there yet. Say, Software, what will you do when you’ll have grown up?

Our Need

Until Software becomes an adult, there’s many applications available, and some of them might solve most of our information collecting needs. How would we define the best proposition?

I believe what we need in any application is that it:

  • supports the features needed,
  • interacts comfortably with us, and
  • keeps doing the previous two criteria in a consistent manner.

This definition is most probably critical in the case of information collection software. When I speak of consistency for information collection purposes, I mean, for example, that whatever the web browser I use and the method I use to collect something, it will always produce the same kind of rich text entry, accompanied by its link.

The Contenders

Now, since this is all about reviewing different applications to see which one of them is closing the most towards maturity, here’s what I tested:

DEVONthink PersonalEagleFilerJournlerNoteBook

ScrivenerSOHO NotesTogetherYojimbo

(more…)